Today I dare you. I dare you to try something unconventional.

One of the basic, underlying principles of intercultural communication is empathy. Empathy is the ability to understand and share the feelings of another person. Without this capacity to imagine yourself in somebody else’s shoes, an encounter of people from different cultural backgrounds will not automatically lead to understanding and tolerance.

I have been astounded lately by the lack of empathy and compassion displayed by members of our society towards people who are experiencing terrible things in life – war, loss of loved ones, violence, constant danger, and humiliation. A study conducted at the University of Michigan in 2010 showed that levels of compassion and empathy are lower now than at any time in the past 30 years. Most alarmingly, trends suggest they are declining at an increasing rate, despite globalization and massive improvements in telecommunication. Thanks to television and internet, we are better connected to other people across the globe, but at the same time we care less about their lives and fates.

Only the development of compassion and understanding for others can bring us the tranquility and happiness we all seek. Dalai Lama XIV

In essence, empathy is a cornerstone of a peaceful and tolerant society. Is there a way to restore and cultivate it? Research suggests that meditation in general, and the practice of mindfulness in particular, encourages caring and benevolent behavior toward oneself and others. I found this encouraging and thought, let’s give it a try. I did some research and found this short (10 minutes) guided meditation focusing on cultivating compassion, kindness and forgiveness. It aims at increasing one’s capacity to feel empathy for people who you would not normally relate to, people from different cultural or social backgrounds, complete strangers.

I invite you to try it. It will only take 10 minutes of your time.

What do you think? How do you feel?